Avocado Seeds: Should We Be Eating Them?

FROM THE FIELDS - ISSUE #73

This amazing green fruit is one of our favourites for any type of meal. You could even say it’s the best super-food that everyone needs.  We’ve noticed this past summer that everyone is raging about eating the avocado seeds so we decided to look into it a bit more. We think this is one health trend to skip and here’s why…

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THE POSSIBILITIES are endless with this creamy green fruit- from smoothies, to dressing, to creamsicles, there are countless was to add this super-food into your routine. Avocados are abundant in essential monounsaturated fats, vitamins and minerals. Most researchers are agreed that the high levels of monounsaturated fat in avocado—especially oleic acid—play an important role in preventing heart disease, balance blood sugar, improve blood levels of LDL, and lower levels of oxidative stress in the bloodstream. Nearly 15 out of the 22 grams of fat (68%) found in one cup of avocado come from monounsaturated fat. Sounds like a lot of fat but it’s good fat so don’t worry. Avocados are also a good source of soluble fiber, which is good for our metabolic health. Avocados are also associated with longevity as they contain potent compounds that regenerate the body. One of those compounds is called Xanthophyll- a powerful antioxidant that reduces the signs of aging.

NOW SHOULD you eat the seeds or not? We say not. Avocado seeds (& leaves) are harmful when ingested in large quantities. And even if you don’t eat large quantities of them, this is still one health trend we suggest skipping. The seeds contain a fungicidal toxin called “Persin”- an oil-soluble compound that can cause gastric obstruction. The lethal dose is not known, as more studies need to be done. So until we know the potential benefits versus the risks of eating the seed, we suggest just getting the fruit for now.